Force Multipliers, Facebook and PR – How to influence everything

2200 words, 8 minute read.

A hammer, a machine gun, social media – using force multipliers for good and bad

The below is a Facebook Ad I ran to a subset of Irish TDs. It cost me €1.65 for 39 of them to see it. €0.04 per TD. I would think most didn’t even know it was an ad.

Irish TDs Facebook Ad

(When Facebook advertising started it was for the U.S. only so I created a U.S. account and this is why my prices are in dollars)

Wikipedia definition of Force Multipliers

factor or a combination of factors that dramatically increases (hence “multiplies”) the effectiveness of an item or group, giving a given number of troops (or other personnel) or weapons (or other hardware) the ability to accomplish greater things than without it

Using digital tools for PR tactics, common enough

Years and years ago a client’s friend had a communications crisis with their firm and asked me how they could solve it. Sadly their board took the advice of a traditional PR company who said shut everything down, say nothing and it will blow over. When you Googled about this issue, the first two pages were mostly negative news articles about it and their website was at the bottom of Page 1. When you Googled their name you got their website and the next 8 results were negative results. You mostly can’t get articles with bad coverage removed from Google. Instead you have to make positive or neutral articles to rank higher than these. Working with bloggers and pumping out PR over the next few months was the solution that worked in this case.

Using Wikipedia to push an agenda

Nowadays if you google that issue, the first result for it is a Wikipedia article of the company with a section about that crisis. Page 2 has some of the original bad news articles but nobody reads Page 2 of Google. That Wikipedia article was created by someone not connected to the company but who did it to aid the company. The article had some basic company history and a section on the crisis. Wikipedia articles always rank well. The Wiki article has been slowly changed over time to add more company facts so the crisis section is one of many sections on the Wiki article. The facts on the Wiki are all true verified facts but the narrative is positive towards them. Years back I did a talk on Crisis Communications that covered some of these areas, I need to update this as I’ve learned so much since.

With media people being under huge pressure to produce quantity over quality and despite media articles shitting on Wikipedia so much, the media copies and pastes from Wikipedia the whole time. Now look at the start of this article … who came up with that definition of Force Multipliers? I didn’t check, how many check where their Wikipedia information came from?

Influencing the influencers with digital

For another gig I researched how teens decided what colleges to apply for. For Leaving Cert students, one factor that actually influenced them moving away from home to college was their mothers. Mammy Power. Mammy could veto a move to some college based on her perception. So to keep Mammy happy we sent Facebook ads to Mammy. The kids don’t use Facebook but their parents and Grannies do (and those that think they can market to Leaving Cert students on Facebook). We also boosted articles about how great the college was to those Mammies. “Don’t take our word for it, look at what the Irish Times have said.” Was there a PR pitch to that paper with that Mammy angle you ask? Hmmm.

A State body a while back asked me to research how an American startup built up their media profile so quickly. At that stage they had been in the Wall Street Journal, Techcrunch and all over “the blogs”. Lots of research later and we had a plan on how Irish companies could build up their media profile like they did. What was lovely about what they did was that they started building relationships with specific bloggers that wrote about that industry area. The startup was small but they gave advanced access to the smaller bloggers who never get exclusives and spend most of their time reporting what was already covered and rewriting Mashable type sites. Uncritical coverage in fairness. Then the company started doing PR with larger blogs, who when they Googled their name (as media always do) and they saw positive coverage and also “seemed” to copy and paste these opinions. And then the company went up higher again to the big media sites and eventually to “traditional” media types. All iterations. Influencing the influencers who influence the Influencers. Boy does this work well. See Mark Ecko on “swag bombs”.

(Aside: In the Digital Strategy Workshops I do, we always find the satellites of influence of your clients, same idea, not at all new to marketing people and PR people have done this since they did a great PR job of getting propaganda changed to PR post World War I)

Ryan Holiday talks about this in Trust Me I’m Lying where he had Wikipedia articles created that referenced facts he seeded on smaller blogs that then got copied into articles from bigger media orgs. Then he edited the Wikipedia pages to reference the new media coverage. Wiki article says “according to Xblog Company Z made 10 million dollars”. Later the New York Times copies this fact in an article. Then changed Wiki article to “according to New York Times Company Z made 10 million dollars” and removed the old blog reference.

So far this is slight use of digital for what are traditional PR tactics…

Along Comes Facebook

Facebook is a political tool or a political weapon, mostly a weapon

One of the biggest protests ever in State history was the water charges protest and the Irish Times didn’t even assign someone to cover it as it wasn’t in their bubble. FF, Sinn Fein, FG, Labour all misjudged this issue yet everyone on Facebook saw the updates before, during and after. Millions on Facebook saw the size of the crowd and the videos.

A hammer is a tool, is a weapon, is a negotiating tactic, is a precise instrument. She who holds it, decides what it is. Back to that Facebook Ad to TDs.

Irish TDs Facebook Ad

For €0.04 each I got a positive news story about Ireland into their timelines. And one clicked it.

I did the same with a bunch of Cork politicians with a ‘local kid does well” story into their timelines:

Cork Councillors Facebook Ad

What was great about that is while I paid next to nothing for them to see it (€1.55) just €0.036 each, some of them shared the story to their connections and so I got an extra 178 free views from this. (you only see the paid views above)

Cork Councillor Ad Stats

So the cost per view was actually €0.007 – 0.7 of 1 cent! This is what makes Facebook so utterly scary. The ads to reach people are cheap but when they interact with your ad you get a lot more people to see it and the politician or whoever it is spreads the story on your behalf.

Changing election results with your pocket money?

I have also run tests where some of the Advisors to TDs and Ministers saw an ad from a Facebook Page of mine that shared a news article. This was a much smaller list but we are getting “news” into the timeline of people that have strong influence over Ministers and TDs.

Facebook Ad Government Advisors

And yeah I ran some tests where I got news stories into the timelines of political correspondents. These tests as you can see are single digit euro budgets.

So basically you can get stories into the face of a large number of national politicians, local politicians, their advisors and those who write about these people and who these people read, for mere pennies. Fucking! pennies! get! you! this! influence! Now, consider multiple Facebook Pages with slightly different takes on things going into timelines of this bubble = “oh my God everyone is talking about this, what are we doing about this?”

What it really means is = Look at all the ads in my bubble who are targeting me. Again, none of this is new for people that work in PR and marketing. Just like you run ads in the Farmers Journal if you sell to farmers.

This is what some of the Brexit campaigners did. Business People for Brexit, Muslims for Brexit, Catholics for Brexit, Racists pretending to be Patriots for Brexit, Doctors for Brexit. Each one of these groups had a set of talking points specific to them and for their audience and off they jaunted with them. Decentralized but with the talking points decided by 1 person.

Read “All Out War” to understand the not-rocket-science stuff that the Leave Campaigns did. We’re seeing this in Ireland around Repeal the 8th. 10 people or less seem to represent 20 different groups but all seem to have the same mailing list. And they always get into the media.

Targeting a constituency
€67 – the cost to me if I want 16,000 people in a constituency to see a news story in the next 24 hours about their TD who barely got in at the last election.

Target a TD's Constituency

Force multiply that article about your local FF TD who voted against the Repeal Referendum, for example. If 500 less people gave them their number 1 and left them off the ballot paper or put them way down the line, would that be enough to lose their seat? €67 spent by someone else could cost you €90k a year, outside of expenses. 0.07% of your salary. That’s a force multiplier.

(Light entertainment break)
And this is a force multiplier:

Force Multipliers for Media Coverage

Just like you can use Facebook to send updates into timelines of politicians and political media you can do the same for many different media types. A client recently got themselves on television. A follow up press release was sent out to the media “as seen on T.V.) which got them a little more coverage, here the media came to them after the release with new angles for their publication. Great! Then a promoted update from them was also sent out on Facebook to media types and that got them more media coverage too. Being in the media can get you into more of the media and doing this with a proper strategy can get you into it on a regular basis.

Using all this media coverage, you then do a promoted update to the type of client they wanted with a “As seen on T.V. and in the Times and Indo”. The Sunday Times got crap recently for boosting Facebook posts. I like this idea. Up to now I’ve only seen media boosting posts that are editorial so they can hoodwink sponsors and say “10,000 people on Facebook saw our editorial about you”. Getting into the media is not the end of that PR cycle, it can just be the start.

Force Multipliers for stakeholders

Getting companies into the Irish Times or Sunday Business Post despite their potential clients not being readers still makes sense if you look at who their stakeholders are. Potential investors, existing investors, business partners and media types will be reading it. Investors seeing coverage of their investment will appeased them and give them golf course bragging rights. It’s amazing that you may be burning through cash but an investor seeing their name in a paper can keep them at bay for another while. A positive side-effect is that traditional media coverage gets you nice Google results too as media orgs have really good Google rankings. So when your name is Google, a front page of positive views.

If you’re a B2B organisation then marketing on Facebook at first doesn’t make sense. There are better places to do marketing but if you want to build your reputation then targeted ads to the decision makers in organisations can work. Be nice if a CEO came in on a Monday and said “I keep hearing about this CRM company, look in to whether we should be using them.”

Whoever your stakeholders are, you can get into their Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter timelines directly or indirectly. You can use Facebook, LinkedIn, Google and Twitter to influence people even when they are not using these places because those who do influence them are in these spaces. You’re really only two hops away from both online and offline people on social media.

And all of this within “the rules”.

And you don’t need the liars in Cambridge Analytica to do this (like they had the brains to do it)

And all of this is adhering to data protection and is legal. You don’t need to hack Facebook and download data to do this and that is not how they won the election in America or how Brexit was won. However a be-bubbled media really want to unlose the Vietnam War of their generation – Trump and Brexit.

Social Media and Videos – Text and Graphics are Weapons of Choice

TLDR;
Just copy Viceland. Until everyone copies Viceland. Then copy someone else.

via GIPHY

With so many videos on social media watched with the sound off, the audiotrack is a bonus feature these days and most people won’t bother turning the sound on. For me I’m seeing about 85% have the sound off when watching videos on social media. – Cos they’re at work or in school so shouldn’t be watching. And in the evening they’re probably watching TV at home but also on their phones.

I like the way Viceland and others are creating content at the moment.

via GIPHY

The Trixie and Katya Show is really fun and the multimedia aspects of it reinforce what is happening as you watch it with sound on. It helps commit more of the show to memory too.

Pop-up video

This stuff isn’t new though but it is having a new use. Remember Pop-up Video on Vh1? Course you don’t, you’re not that old. Adding facts via pop up bubbles to music videos. Great idea to keep you engaged with the content.

via GIPHY

Dare you to play the below and not be engaged.

From Pop Up Video: The New Historicism by Gary Burns & Timothy E. Scheurer:

Pop Up Video is a postmodern recapitulation of music video, television, sound film, and silent film, including almost all of the techniques and conventions ever used to combine music with moving images. Moreover, the oval graphics reassert the conventions of silent film intertitling more strongly than at any time since the 1920s.

Blind Dates USA used to add snarky comments or give you information the person wasn’t diclosing, letting the audience in to some gossip.
Social Media Video Guide - Blind Dates USA 1

Social Media and Video - Blind Dates USA 2

The visual manifestation of the director’s commentary. Sometimes telling you exactly what you are seeing, sometimes letting only you into a secret, sometimes changing your perspective.

Asia and TVmojis

These days we ought to look at South Asia to see what is happening with text and image overlays on content. Shows in China, Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea add context via text and images that pop up and around. In Deconstructing overhearing viewers: TVmojis as story retellers, Xi Cui gives examples of a few shows that are doing this. Also he introduces us to the term TVmojis. This is kind of like what the Trixie and Katya show are doing.

The author argues that by playing various roles, TVmojis help construct the viewer’s sense of being a bystander while concealing the producers’ manipulations of the media’s interactive roles vis-à-vis the viewers.

via GIPHY

via GIPHY

Hit the Diff on Videos

Why do all of this? On social media you start off at 0% interest unless you have a fanbase of super-engaged people. For purposes of this article, we’ll pretend that this is factual. So you are pitching to get interest and retain interest. The fascinating thing with this is: the longer someone watches, the longer they keep watching. This also means that it is very hard to keep people watching even past 1 second but once you get them past 3 seconds, 5 seconds and 10 seconds they want to skip past the video less. Also, as more timelines are watched over by a sometimes benevolent algorithm, those that have their videos watched longer than 10 seconds will be gifted by having their next pieces of content seen too. These pop up texts/emojis/visual elements are ways to get people more engaged with your content and can almost work like bridges if there are lulls in some of your content.

29 short lectures on Digital Marketing

January 13th 2015, 2pm, Dublin

To kickstart 2015 I’m going to give a seminar in Dublin, possibly 90 minutes to 120 minutes long. What will it cover? Keep reading. It’s “almost” free to those that are clients or came along to the various Mulley Events in 2014. Spaces are limited. That last line was marketing bullshit making you think a resource is limited so you’ll want it more. They are though.

The seminar is called “29 short lectures on digital marketing” which is a total ripoff of the amazing “28 short lectures” given by Mary Reufle. There won’t be 29 lectures but they will be short.

This seminar is going to be on January 13th in Dublin City Centre (not booked venue yet, usually near Temple Bar) from 2pm to 4pm or a little beyond. Bring your own teas and coffees.

If you want to sign up, you can use this Eventbrite link. It’s €5 to book a place which won’t cover operating costs but ensures you might turn up. In Ireland, free events have a 50% no-show rate. 50% don’t bother turning up or letting you know.

And I’ll talk about:

  • Various elements on making Facebook work: Edgerank and all that, what updates are best, why if you ignore it for B2C you’re a dope.
  • Twitter: Growing, automating, lead generation, Twitter cards.
  • LinkedIn: This is B2B and it works a charm. How to use it to build an amazingly rich address book.
  • Google+: Haha, just kidding.
  • Mailchimp: Some quick tips from a non-expert.

Why am I doing this? Testing out new material and to gauge interest in the paid courses I’ll be running in January/February – Lead Generation, Digital Strategy, Advanced Twitter. And because I’m sound.

Social Media Consultant dot ie

SocialMediaConsultant.ie was dropped as a domain the other day so I went and grabbed it. Also of late I nabbed ItCourses.ie and a few like that.

Right now I’m sticking a holding page up there to see what kind of traffic it gets from a little optimisation but I may eventually use it as a guide for people/businesses on how to figure out how to hire a social media consultant that is good at their job.

Maybe Michele and I can start some kind of TV detective show with him owning the Social Media Expert domain.

5 minutes can positively impact your business – Here’s how

Five minutes will transform your business

Your website:

Every webpage on your website has two interesting properties: One called a Title, one called a Description. If you add relevant keywords (based on what people search for) to these titles and descriptions, you can increase your website visitors easily by 20% and this only takes 5 minutes. The change takes 5 minutes, the initial impact takes 3 weeks depending on Google’s coming around.

Your Facebook:

Your Facebook Business Page has a tool called Insights that only you can access. It tells you the time of the week and time of the day that are the best to do updates in order to be seen by the most people. Look at these figures (takes 3 mins) and you can have your updates seen by more people.

Your Twitter:

Do you know when people that follow you on Twitter are most active, do you know what Tweets of yours were clicked on the most? Log on to ads.Twitter.com and Twitter will tell you. From that plan your Tweets to go out at the Prime times during the day and week

Mulley Communications does training courses and consultancy around strategy. Sign up to the courses list or our mailing list.

Facebook for Business: Intermediate – March 24th 2014

This course is now over but If you want to be informed of when the next Social Media Courses/Digital Marketing Courses are, please fill in this form.

Facebook Training – Dublin – March 24th 2014

We’re going to make your Facebook Business Page give you a return on your investment.

The average Facebook update now gets seen by about 10% of your fans. Do you know what your Page Reach is? Do you know who actually sees your updates? Do you know who they are? Do you want to increase this reach, do you want to get your Fans to do something for you?

This Facebook for Business training course is for those that already have a Facebook Page and is ranked at an Intermediate level. It starts from the assumption you are comfortable with using Facebook.

What’s covered:

  • Metrics: Let’s see how you’re doing now, what to look at and what we can improve.
  • Grow your Numbers – More Likes, More Reach, More Clicks, More Comments.
  • Edgerank – The silent killer on Facebook. Get to know this algorithm and future-proof your Page.
  • Spreadable media – What content will get you the right attention.
  • Updates – Targeted updates to get better reactions, promoted updates, timed updates.

Your trainer is Damien Mulley.

Date and Time:
1.45pm until 5.15pm on March 24th in Dublin City Centre

Pricing:
€97 for the half day workshop if paid before March 18th.
Or €147 for payment on the day with a 50% deposit by March 18th.

(We take cheque or we can take credit card over the phone.)
A 50% cancelation fee applies if you cancel less than three days before the workshop.

Location
Dublin City Centre

This course is now over but If you want to be informed of when the next Social Media Courses/Digital Marketing Courses are, please fill in this form.

Your Digital NCT

Mulley Communications does training courses and consultancy around strategy. Sign up to the courses list or our mailing list.

If you want to start being serious about digital in 2014 and it’s a good idea to be so, then you need to up your game. Digital is going to get harder and harder in 2014, the easy days are gone, so you need to be more efficient and strategic about what you do.

So here’s a checklist on what you ought to be aware of. Pick one area to concentrate on or all. This is not a definitive list. (That gets me out of getting into trouble)

Overall Digital:
Are you mobile first in all things digital?

Website:

  • Is your website mobile first?
  • Make your website responsive by re-designing it or adding some responsive plugins to it.
  • If you can’t make it responsive, then have elements that allow the site to perform while being viewed on a mobile e.g. your number in text on the front page, same with email. No crappy contact forms.
  • Do you have a content and search optimisation plan?
  • Do you have Google Analytics or something better installed?

Facebook:

  • Learn about Edgerank.
  • Forget Page likes, the most important thing is your reach. How many people actually see any update of yours? It is less and sometimes WAY less than the number of likes.
  • What is your post engagement rate? How many people click on your post or Like it or share it or comment on it? The more people that engage with your updates, the more signals Facebook gets to keep sending your updates to your fans on the Page. Engagements are very low? Your reach is going to go down and down over time.
  • Are you updates short to be seen on mobiles?
  • Are you images using up as much of the timeline as possible?
  • What is your content plan?
  • Are you timing updates?

Simply put: Good content = good reactions = over time you retain or grow the reach of your page. Good content timed = reaching the best possible numbers each time.

Twitter:

  • Who are the people you are following?
  • Who are the people that follow you?
  • How many RTs would you get on a Tweet that’s business related?
  • How many new follows do you get a week?
  • Are your images the right size to be displayed nicely in the timeline?
  • Do you have a growth plan for Twitter?
  • Do you have a content plan for Twitter?
  • Are you timing updates?
  • How many clicks on average do you Tweets get? Are they going to your website?

Instagram, Vine, Snapchat

  • Are your audiences on Instagram? Find out.
  • Should you be using Vine? Will quick 6 second videos get you customers? They could.
  • Are many of your demographic under 20? Yes? So why are you not on Snapchat?

And you’ll never guess who does this stuff for companies? Yeah.

Contact us if you want a full evaluation or an evaluation of on one of your channels.

Mulley Communications does training courses and consultancy around strategy. Sign up to the courses list or our mailing list.

Snapchat: Why isn’t your brand on it?

Updated as of June 2014.

Every now and then someone will write a post encouraging you to bandwagon on to the latest trend in digital. This is such a post. Snapchat is now mainstream and pretty huge in Ireland. IPSOS MRBI says 21% of adults aged 15+ are on Snapchat in Ireland. 9 months ago it was 11%.

June 2014 Snapchat in Ireland stats

The data is there to show that for younger demographics, it’s not just Facebook anymore. And these younger demographics marched Bebo, Instagram, mySpace and Facebook into the mainstream. Right now, there are 500 Million photos or videos uploaded to Snapchat every day. That’s about the same as the number of photos uploaded to Facebook and 5 times as many as Instagram.

Snapchat, the sexting thing?

Get over yourself. People were sending silly pictures of themselves well before Snapchat but Snapchat is seen as one of the enablers of this. Snapchat is a great little app that allows you to send pictures or videos taken right now to your friends and they are guaranteed to expire/evaporate in ten seconds or less when clicked on. You can write a teeny amount of text on the image or video and draw on it too. The images are not on their phone, they’re not on the Snapchat servers. Lost forever like tears in the rain. Ephemermal media they’re calling it.

SnapchatPicture

If someone manages to take a screenshot, Snapchat informs you of this so you know not to trust that person again. In extreme cases, when you basically hack into the phone and connect it to a computer, you may find a picture in a temporary file on the phone but that’s it. Pretty safe really.

So your brand isn’t there, why?

Hardly any companies are using Snapchat in Europe to market, which is a shame. If one of your core audiences are Irish people ages 15-20 then Snapchat is one place they’re at. Some companies in America are using Snapchat to connect to the “right audience” and do stuff around competitions and vouchers. Still, hardly any case studies right now. 16 Handles and Taco Bell are rolled out again and again right now but that will change.

What some companies are doing to Market on Snapchat:

  • Vouchers: Discount codes, 10% off vouchers. Show at till type things.
  • Contests: Submit a picture type contests. Take a picture of a product and add a comment.
  • Interactions: Just having a fun back and forth with users e.g. Holding a sign with loads of people’s names.
  • Exclusives: Tell Snapchat first before other channels. (A great way to build numbers)

Snapchat Stories are made for brands

Now that Snapchat has serious investment and it has a huge audience, it needs to commercialise what they’re doing. Everything these days is about the timeline so Snapchat is now going to try and do something with that. First comes creating something that end users will appreciate and then they can make money off it later. Enter Snapchat Stories.

Snapchat Stories allow you to weave Snapchats you made into a piece of content that is viewable for 24 hours. You can add to this Story any time you want and it gets tacked on to the end of the story. When people log in, they can see in the timeline, any Stories from friends. This is mine:

SnapChatme

This is a Vine of a Snapchat Story I made:

And stats released this week (June 23rd 2014) show that Snapchat Stories are getting … dun dun dun, 1 billion views PER DAY. Highly successful. There still aren’t any tools for brands to use but give them time, they’ll have them.

In the week that Facebook (who?) released Slingshot (what?), Snapchat announced a new feature for a single brand (for now). People will be able to add their content to the Snapchat Story of a brand at a specific location. It’s called Our Story. Done around a music festival for now. Body and Soul was last week and various Snapchatters were keeping me in the loop via photos and videos. Perfect alignment. Expect to see big brands host these around music festivals, launches, fashion weeks etc.

Some tips:
If you bung a load of photos or videos together on to your Story, they can become quite boring, even if just a minute long. Make the shots snappy and have an actual story in place. This means pre-planning for it. Use text in your Story to accentuate or explain the content. Fail fast and fail cheap: Try things, mess about. It’s Snapchat, silly mistakes do disappear.

I await a band making a music video and sharing it as a Snapchat Story. 10 second bursts, it can be done.

Snapchat Drawbacks

Right now Snapchat is mobile only and everything needs to be done through the mobile app for iPhone or for Android. There are no official apps for businesses that can be used. You can’t “officially” upload premade material to Snapchat so you can’t have highly produced content. (There are obviously unofficial ways around this, same for Vine) I’m sure if you are a huge brand though, there probably is a tool you can use for Snapchat that does allow uploading of pre-made video. Vine definitely has this.

Law of diminishing returns

Like everything else before it, Snapchat Stories will work really well for the first while but as more people and more brands start to saturate your timeline, they’ll become less effective. Same has happened with Banner Ads, Google Ads, Facebook Ads and it will happen with Twitter promoted tweets too. Get in early, make the most of it and then analyse what is coming next and be ready for it.

Do have fun on Snapchat.

Update: June 2014

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When Jamie Heaslip Tweets about you…

So what happens when someone with about 100,000 Twitter followers Tweets about you?

Recently Jamie Heaslip tweeted a link out about a project:

When Jamie Heaslip Tweets
When Jamie Heaslip Tweets

It gets 9 Retweets and 11 favourites.

Since Jamie used Bit.ly as a way to link, we can measure the clicks: https://bitly.com/1eh2TAL+

So it got 1096 clicks and you can see all of them were in the first few hours and then nothing.

1096 lifetime clicks
1096 lifetime clicks

400 in first hour. Bit.ly timestamp is EDT, 8pm EDT = 1pm Ireland. (add a + to any Bit.ly link you see and you too can see the stats)

Clicks on a Jamie Heaslip Tweet
Clicks on a Jamie Heaslip Tweet

So 1% of Jamie’s followers clicked that link. 99% didn’t. We could argue that it was a Saturday so less clicks but sport fans might be tuned in more that day too though and just before 1pm would seem like a good time, no?

So what if you’re just a small fish in a big pond?

Have a look at this Tweet from Sex Siopa, a Sex Shop looking for help. Boy do they get it:

Sex Siopa 133 RTs
Sex Siopa 134 RTs

133 Retweets later and a few new followers for them. They get mentioned on Broadsheet.ie and Joe.ie and other places. They seem small and genuine so people in a way are more interested in helping them out. To date they only have 401 followers but this small fish makes a lot of waves in the big pond.

133 Retweets means that Tweet was easily shared into the timelines of 40,000 ore more people. (The average active Twitter user is followed by about 2-300 accounts.)

So being rough about the numbers, that sex shop with all their RTs got half as much reach as Jamie Heaslip’s Tweet. So you don’t necessarily need to have big numbers if you have a genuine message to share or if the message is fun or controversial or anti-establishment.

Online PR Workshop

This course is now over but you can see other Digital Marketing Courses here. If you want to add your name to future training courses, fill in this form.

An Online PR workshop incorporating Search Engine Optimisation (SEO)

Monday September 2nd, 2.10pm – 5.00pm – Temple Bar Hotel, Dublin
Thursday 29th August, 1.30pm – 4.30pm – Limerick

Book this
A while back, I got a client some coverage in the Irish Times, they saw an increase of 20 visitors that day to their website. A few weeks later they got coverage in an app review blog. In 24 hours, they saw over 500 installs of their app. The Irish Times was good for potential investors reading about them, an app review blog got them consumer installs though. Different spaces for different audiences.

As people get more of their news from other online sources and not just newspapers and radio stations, PR/Comms people need to have a wider understanding of how to get online coverage. This includes the right keywords to use and what sites to pitch to. The same rules apply in some circumstances and other rules for other media. In fairness (ass-kissing moment) many PR firms do this very well and are adapting quickly so this workshop is not for everyone.

I’ve previously done a workshop like this but this is massively updated.

This half-day workshop will cover:

  • 0. Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) and why even a press release ought to be optimised.
  • 1. Getting your news found in search engines using your own site and media sites.
  • 2. Pitching to bloggers and online news sites without being a spammer.
  • 3. Making your own media: Videos, images (infographics), Slideshare presentations.
  • 4. Spreadable media: Using Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn to help spread the good word.
  • 5. How to deal with a crisis (the online perspective).

Suitability:
This is suitable for those that work in a PR/Comms role or for companies that do their own PR. Bring a laptop too if you can. It is expected that you know PR already and can compose your own press releases.

Fee: €147

Public Dates:
Monday September 2nd, 1.30pm – 4.30pm – Dublin
Thursday 29th August, 1.30pm – 4.30pm – Limerick

In-house:
This can be run in-house too and can be customised. Email damien@mulley.ie if you want prices.